The Doctoral & Master’s Project and the Oral Examination 2018-03-22T19:12:16+00:00

The Doctoral Projects, and Oral Examinations

Overview

The project and the required oral examination are constructed to test the candidate’s knowledge and competencies as a practitioner in his or her profession.

Research and Design I, II and the Project

The candidates will discuss with the Dean their areas of interest. Books, journals and other material will be reviewed. The dissertation or project will be preceded by a preliminary and final outline. The final outline will be the basis for the written dissertation or project. For the doctoral candidates, the completion of the outline will complete the coursework for Research and Design I, II.

The object of the courses is to enhance the research and design abilities of the candidates. Both primary and secondary research techniques and competencies will be enhanced through the development of the project. The result of this research will be the foundation and the design for the dissertation or project to be approved by the Dean.

The doctoral candidate will present to the Dean approximately one hundred fifty pages of double-spaced research which includes bibliography, charts, graphs, appendices or any material relevant to the research. After the research has been reviewed and accepted by the Dean, the research will be the basis for the questions to be asked at the oral examination.

The master’s candidate must complete Research I but are not required to have an oral defense. Master’s candidates will present to the Dean approximately seventy-five double-spaced pages which includes bibliography, charts, graphs, appendices or any material relevant to the research. Master’s candidates are not required to have an oral defense or do Research & Design II.

 

THE PROJECT GUIDELINES

 

The Oral Examination

The candidate will appear before a panel of experts, including the Dean, for the dissertation or project oral examination lasting one and one half to three hours. The University has determined that a superior approach to the traditional academic format is to have two or three candidates appear together. The result is a non-competitive atmosphere where examiners and candidates have the opportunity to exchange ideas and information. An environment eliminating the focus upon a sole candidate reduces stress and enables the examiners to better judge the qualifications of those seeking their degree.